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How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom? GCSE Controlled Assessment Day 4

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom?

Extremes of emotions are a vital part to any text, whether it is a novel, play or poem. In this essay I will be exploring the emotions felt and the techniques used to display these. I will be analysing the revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus; the first play written by the famous playwright William Shakespeare (written between 1593 and 1594), and poems from a selection of World War One war poems, by the war poets Wilfred Owen and Seigfried Sassoon. Both the play and the poems are founded upon violence and revenge, which plays a significant part in both, and it is because of this that strong emotions are felt in both.

The fact that Titus Andronicus was Shakespeare’s first play is a huge factor towards its violence and base around anger; as a budding playwright with no reputation Shakespeare needed to capture the attention of the public in a big way. To do this, he essentially did the best thing possible: base his play around violence. In the late 16th century, violent action had a large audience, due to the macho attitude of the people and the male predominance in both those acting and viewing plays. Titus Andronicus is considered Shakespeare’s most violent play, possibly due to the fact that the production of Titus Andronicus had built him a reputation to rely on. As with life, violence will always have a negative outcome on at least one party, and to suit this the main emotions show in this play are grief and despair.
Both Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) were soldiers within the first world war, fighting on the front line. Both wrote the majority of their poems whilst in hospital back from the front lines, and actually met each other in Scotland. The rebellious and truthful messages in the poems that they wrote about the war, illustrating it in a sad and tragic light, were previously unheard of. However, it is speculated that these ‘rebellious’ thought could have been due to the fact that both men were considered social outcasts; as they were both homosexual in a time that homosexuality was not considered acceptable. This would have slightly alienated them from the whole, allowing them to view and describe the war from a different perspective.

In Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and many of the war poems, an iambic pentameter is a key part of the structure of the texts. It is heard mainly when the texts are performed vocally with a heavier beat stressing every second syllable with ten syllables a link, emulating the audiences heartbeat in addition to emphasising certain words. Within characters, iambic pentameter is used to show confidence, and Shakespeare has only used this technique on selected characters, who are the most important.
“She is the weeping welkin, in the earth/Then must my sea be moved with her sighs” (Titus- Act 3 scene 1).
Within this monologue by Titus, mourning the loss of Lavinia’s beauty, hands and tongue, the iambic pentameter is clear. However, as shown by the second line of this quote, Shakespeare has utilised a weak foot-a line with a different number of syllables to the regular meter (nine in this case). This degradation of the meter shows all confidence that Titus had leaving him, and shows that the despair he feels is overwhelming his ability to speak. The weak foot/degradation of the meter technique was very noticeable while watching the play, with the slight pause in the speech letting the words settle in, and increase their impact on the audience.
The poetry also makes use of an iambic pentameter, evidence of this is found in Wilfred Owen’s ‘Anthem for Doomed youth’:
“The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;/and bugles calling for them from sad shires”
Due to the fact that the words are difficult to read fast, the iambic pentameter creates an effect of a slow funeral march, showing the feeling of intense sadness. The emphasised second beat can also be interpreted as the heavy thud of shells falling, giving the poem persona. This poem also utilises the technique of a weak foot, used in this case to question the audience with a rhetorical question;
“What passing bells for those who die as cattle?”
The extra syllable in this line breaks the rhythm and will create a break in the flow when it is performed. Personally, I think that this is particularly effective technique as when it was read out it causes the audience to reflect on the question that was asked, and leaves part of the interpretation of the poem up to the audience’s imaginations.

The iambic pentameter, and weak foots within it, are both techniques that show extensive use in both the play and the poems to convey emotion. However, the emotion shown in the play and poem differs; in the play it originally show Titus as confident, almost too the point of arrogant:
“Thou great defender of this Capitol/stand gracious to the rites that we intend!”
The subsequent degradation of this meter shows sadness, but it an angry sadness filled with regret and woe.
On the other hand, Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth seems more void of emotions than Titus Andronicus, feeling like a sadness that has caused the writer of the play to become an introvert, and sequester their thoughts within themselves. This effect was also created by the use of irony, paired with powerful words.

Irony is a key technique used in all of the war poetry. Wilfred Owen was killed on the 4th of November, 1918, exactly a week before Armistice. The dramatic irony of this was that his poems all looked down upon the war, and were against the propaganda of it. The fact that his death was due to the war amplifies his poems’ demeanour against the war, adding persona. Within his poems, irony is also a key device used.

‘Anthem for doomed youth’. Within just the title of this poem, Wilfred Owen has already managed to show the emotion of despair, foreshadowing the futures of the soldiers that are marching to war. To do this, he has used the technique of assonance- using a certain repeated sound to convey a message or emotion. The repeated ‘oo’ sound is an extremely woeful sound, and the presence of this emotion from the beginning of the poem shows that the woe and misery is felt even before the soldiers get to war. Strong examples of assonance are also found in the second verse of this poem.
“No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells;
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.”
When reading this verse, there is a distinctive ‘o’ sound which creates a negative feel to the poem, enhancing the emotion of sadness. Together, all of these small effects communicate the feeling of hopelessness towards sending young men off to fight, which is also the key message of the poem.
Again within the title of his poem, Wilfred Owen has used an oxymoron, ‘Doomed Youth’. The word youth show that the person is young and fresh, with a future, but this is directly contradicted by the word doomed, which shows an end (death) that is unavoidable. Wilfred Owen has linked these two concepts with assonance, bringing the two words extremely close together and linking them, to show that any youth who goes to war is inexplicitly doomed. This again backs up his view on the war and the horrors of war, conveying the emotion of despair, and pity to all of those caught up in it.

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom? GCSE Controlled Assessment Day 3

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom?

Extremes of emotions are a vital part to any text, whether it is a novel, play or poem. In this essay I will be exploring the emotions felt and the techniques used to display these. I will be analysing the revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus; the first play written by the famous playwright William Shakespeare (written between 1593 and 1594), and poems from a selection of World War One war poems, by the war poets Wilfred Owen and Seigfried Sassoon. Both the play and the poems are founded upon violence and revenge, which plays a significant part in both, and it is because of this that strong emotions are felt in both.

The fact that Titus Andronicus was Shakespeare’s first play is a huge factor towards its violence and base around anger; as a budding playwright with no reputation Shakespeare needed to capture the attention of the public in a big way. To do this, he essentially did the best thing possible: base his play around violence. In the late 16th century, violent action had a large audience, due to the macho attitude of the people and the male predominance in both those acting and viewing plays. Titus Andronicus is considered Shakespeare’s most violent play, probably because he did not need any more to make an ‘entrance’ into the theatrical world. As with life, violence will always have a negative outcome on at least one party, and to suit this the main emotions show in this play are grief and despair.
Both Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) were soldiers within the first world war, fighting on the front line. Both wrote the majority of their poems whilst in hospital back from the front lines, and actually met each other in Scotland. The rebellious and truthful messages in the poems that they wrote about the war, illustrating it in a sad and tragic light, were previously unheard of. However, it is speculated that these ‘rebellious’ thought could have been due to the fact that both men were considered social outcasts; as they were both homosexual in a time that homosexuality was not considered acceptable. This would have slightly alienated them from the whole, allowing them to view and describe the war from a different perspective.

In Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and many of the war poems, an iambic pentameter is a key part of the structure of the texts. It is heard mainly when the texts are performed vocally with a heavier beat stressing every second syllable with ten syllables a link, emulating the audiences heartbeat in addition to emphasising certain words. Within characters, iambic pentameter is used to show confidence, and Shakespeare has only used this technique on selected characters, who are the most important.
“She is the weeping welkin, in the earth/Then must my sea be moved with her sighs” (Titus- Act 3 scene 1).
Within this monologue by Titus, mourning the loss of Lavinia’s beauty, hands and tongue, the iambic pentameter is clear. However, as shown by the second line of this quote, Shakespeare has utilised a weak foot-a line with a different number of syllables to the regular meter (nine in this case). This degradation of the meter shows all confidence that Titus had leaving him, and shows that the despair he feels is overwhelming his ability to speak. The weak foot/degradation of the meter technique was very noticeable while watching the play, with the slight pause in the speech letting the words settle in, and increase their impact on the audience.
The poetry also makes use of an iambic pentameter, evidence of this is found in Wilfred Owen’s ‘Anthem for Doomed youth’:
“The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;/and bugles calling for them from sad shires”
Due to the fact that the words are difficult to read fast, the iambic pentameter creates an effect of a slow funeral march, showing the feeling of intense sadness. The emphasised second beat can also be interpreted as the heavy thud of shells falling, giving the poem persona. This poem also utilises the technique of a weak foot, used in this case to question the audience with a rhetorical question;
“What passing bells for those who die as cattle?”
The extra syllable in this line breaks the rhythm and will create a break in the flow when it is performed. Personally, I think that this is particularly effective technique as when it was read out it causes the audience to reflect on the question that was asked, and leaves part of the interpretation of the poem up to the audience’s imaginations.

The iambic pentameter, and weak foots within it, are both techniques that show extensive use in both the play and the poems to convey emotion. However, the emotion shown in the play and poem differs; in the play it originally show Titus as confident, almost too the point of arrogant:
“Thou great defender of this Capitol/stand gracious to the rites that we intend!”
The subsequent degradation of this meter shows sadness, but it an angry sadness filled with regret and woe.
On the other hand, Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth seems more void of emotions than Titus Andronicus, feeling like a sadness that has caused the writer of the play to become an introvert, and hide within themselves. This effect was also created by the use of irony, paired with powerful words.

Irony is a key technique used in all of the war poetry. Wilfred Owen was killed on the 4th of November, 1918, exactly a week before Armistice. The dramatic irony of this was that his poems all looked down upon the war, and were against the propaganda of it. The fact that his death was due to the war amplifies his poems’ demeanour against the war, adding persona.

To use: sequestered

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom? GCSE Controlled Assessment Day 2

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom?

Extremes of emotions are a vital part to any text, whether it is a novel, play or poem. In this essay I will be exploring the emotions felt and the techniques used to display these. I will be analysing the revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus; the first play written by the famous playwright William Shakespeare (written between 1593 and 1594), and poems from a selection of World War One war poems, by the war poets Wilfred Owen and Seigfried Sassoon. Both the play and the poems are founded upon violence and revenge, which plays a significant part in both, and it is because of this that strong emotions are felt in both.

The fact that Titus Andronicus was Shakespeare’s first play is a huge factor towards its violence and base around anger; as a budding playwright with no reputation Shakespeare needed to capture the attention of the public in a big way. To do this, he essentially did the best thing possible: base his play around violence. In the late 16th century, violent action had a large audience, due to the macho attitude of the people and the male predominance in both those acting and viewing plays. Titus Andronicus is considered Shakespeare’s most violent play, probably because he did not need any more to make an ‘entrance’ into the theatrical world. As with life, violence will always have a negative outcome on at least one party, and to suit this the main emotions show in this play are grief and despair.
Both Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) were soldiers within the first world war, fighting on the front line. Both wrote the majority of their poems whilst in hospital back from the front lines, and actually met each other in Scotland. The rebellious and truthful messages in the poems that they wrote about the war, illustrating it in a sad and tragic light, were previously unheard of. However, it is speculated that these ‘rebellious’ thought could have been due to the fact that both men were considered social outcasts; as they were both homosexual in a time that homosexuality was not considered acceptable. This would have slightly alienated them from the whole, allowing them to view and describe the war from a different perspective.

In Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and many of the war poems, an iambic pentameter is a key part of the structure of the texts. It is heard mainly when the texts are performed vocally with a heavier beat stressing every second syllable with ten syllables a link, emulating the audiences heartbeat in addition to emphasising certain words. Within characters, iambic pentameter is used to show confidence, and Shakespeare has only used this technique on selected characters, who are the most important.
“She is the weeping welkin, in the earth/Then must my sea be moved with her sighs” (Titus- Act 3 scene 1).
Within this monologue by Titus, mourning the loss of Lavinia’s beauty, hands and tongue, the iambic pentameter is clear. However, as shown by the second line of this quote, Shakespeare has utilised a weak foot-a line with a different number of syllables to the regular meter (nine in this case). This degradation of the meter shows all confidence that Titus had leaving him, and shows that the despair he feels is overwhelming his ability to speak. The weak foot/degradation of the meter technique was very noticeable while watching the play, with the slight pause in the speech letting the words settle in, and increase their impact on the audience.

To use: sequestered

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom? GCSE Controlled Assessment Day 1

How have extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WW1 poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text onstage, on screen and in the classroom?

Extremes of emotions are a vital part to any text, whether it is a novel, play or poem. In this essay I will be exploring the emotions felt and the techniques used to display these. I will be analysing the revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus; the first play written by the famous playwright William Shakespeare (written between 1593 and 1594), and poems from a selection of World War One war poems, by the war poets Wilfred Owen and Seigfried Sassoon. Both the play and the poems are founded upon violence and revenge, which plays a significant part in both, and it is because of this that strong emotions are felt in both.
The fact that Titus Andronicus was Shakespeare’s first play is a huge factor towards its violence and base around anger; as a budding playwright with no reputation Shakespeare needed to capture the attention of the public in a big way. To do this, he essentially did the best thing possible: base his play around violence. In the late 16th century, violent action had a large audience, due to the macho attitude of the people and the male predominance in both those acting and viewing plays. Titus Andronicus is considered Shakespeare’s most violent play, probably because he did not need any more to make an ‘entrance’ into the theatrical world. As with life, violence will always have a negative outcome on at least one party, and to suit this, the main emotions show in this play are grief and despair.
Both Wilfred Owen DATES and Seigfried Sassoon DATES were soldiers within the first world war, fighting on the front line. Both wrote the majority of their poems whilst in hospital back from the front lines, and actually met each other in Scotland.

To begin with, it is important to understand the historical of the

To use: sequestered

Plan for Titus Andronicus and war poems assessment.

INTRO
– Strong Emotions
– Introduce war poems
– Introduce Titus Andronicus

– Both made to be performed!!(key point, audiences reactions) perform vs read. simplicity in poems.

– Historical contextcontext – in Shakespearean times revenge is acceptable, but in Roman times revenge was expected of you (feuds). WW1 dying for honour was ok.

– Interpretations of both?

1) METER/STRUCTURE
– Iambic pentameter – confidence in Titus Andronicus.
– Breaking of meter – Despair, regret in poems
– Weak foot – finishing on a different syllable to the rest of the lines. Shows degeneration of Titus’ sanity. Quotes found in act 3 scene 1. How to die – ‘with due regard to decent taste’. Last line weak foot suggests that there’s more to it, showing the sarcasm felt by the author and the irony.

Ceasura- changing emotions, uncertainty. Overwhelming emotion. Used in both
– Titus Andronicus – ‘I am the sea; hark how her sighs doth blow!’ Act 3 scene 1
– How to die, S.Owen – ‘not with haste/and shuddering groans; but passing though it’. Suppression of emotion. These lines also use the technique of apposition- putting two side of the argument side by side.

Enjambment – line flows into the next -creating and sense of overflowing emotion.
Titus -‘Then must my earth with her continual tears/Become a deluge, overflow’d and drown’d’
‘Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes/shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes’

IRONY- big technique, used in all, particuarly how to die. Dramatic irony key; in both the audience/reader knows what other characters plans are, or the fate of the soldiors (death). Persona, dramatic. Wilfred Owen’s poems are all ironic due to his death.

ANGER-ARONANGER-ARON IS THE EMOTION

MODERN CONTEXT- What we saw at Stratford upon aven.
Interpretation of poems-acceptance, sadness, regret, passing on.

CONCLUSION- Revenge hurts everyone, include aron being anger here?

Shakespeare coursework, war poetry anthology, Wilfred Owen, Titus Andronicus

Shakespeare and Wilfred Owen both show similar emotions and use similar emotions to express them.
Devastation- shown in both Titus Andronicus and all of Wilfred Owens works. It is a key emotion as it forms the basis of Shakespeare’s revenge tragedy, and is the main feeling that is conveyed by Wilfred Owen’s poems.

The breaking down of characters is shown in both Shakespeare’s and Wilfred Owen’s works, and are both shown by a similar technique. The main technique used is the use of an iambic meter, and the breaking down of it. Within both texts, the iambic pentameter gradually breaks down, reflecting the state that the characters are in. Within Titus Andronicus, this is also shown by lines ending on a weak foot (weaker beat of the meter), creating an air of uncertainty as they’re faltering.
“For why my bowels cannot hide her woes” 9beats, ends on weak foot.

Meter, break down of meter reflects characters breaking down

Confusion/multitude of emotions/uncertainty – ceasura
Enjamberment

Practice exam questions

Read Source 1, the online newspaper article called Wind farms could blight one in six beauty
spots by Ben Leach.
1 What do you learn from Ben Leach’s article about the issues and concerns regarding
the building of wind farms? (8 marks)

From Ben Leach’s article concerning the issues and concerns of building wind farms I learnt that at out of a total of 89 sites ‘given special protection due to the quality of their landscape’, 14 sites have had planning permission or are awaiting planing permission for wind turbines to be built. These sites, including Cornwall, the Lake District, The outer Hebrides and the Shetland Islands, will have will have turbines between 335 ft and 415 ft upon them.
Environmentalists and conservationists have both called for the wind turbines not to be built for reasons such as the destruction of the “iconic landscape” “behind a barrage of rotating turbines” and the death of ‘more than one million birds a year’, in particularly dozens of golden plover, a protected species.
On the other hand, Charles Aglin (from the British Wind Energy Association)believes that wind turbines are for the better; ‘the biggest threat to the UK’s and the world’s habitats and wild life is catastrophic climate change’ and so supports the wind turbine construction. He tells the protesters that decisions should be made on a ‘case by case’ basis.

Now read Source 2, the article and the picture which goes with it called, Up, up and away – the
day that armchair travel really took off by Valentine Low.
2 Explain how the headline and picture are effective and how they link to the text.(8 marks)

The headline to the article ‘Up, up and away’ is particularly effective, as it is a well-known saying that catches the readers’ attention. It is also very relevant to the content of the text, which is about a man crossing the English channel on a chair suspended by helium balloons, due to the helium balloons taking him upwards, and then ‘away’. The font used in the title is much larger than that used in the rest of the text, meaning that it stands out. The rest of the title ‘the day that armchair travel really took off’ also entices the reader to read on, as it is an unusual thing to be happening.
The image used is also extremely effective; the bright colours of the man on a chair suspended by colourful balloons in front of the white cliffs of Dover really stand out, making the reader interested in the article and want to read more. It is also relevant to the to the article, which compares the armchair to the film Up. It references Up as the image strongly resembles the house suspended by balloons in the film. Finally, within the image there is a feeling of serenity, which is used to describe this method of transport by Mr Trappe.

Titus andronicus act 4 scene 1

Lucius’s son runs from Lavinia (his aunt), holding some books.
He drops one, and Lavinia flicks through it until she finds the story of philomela and terms, which is about the rape of philomela, who’s tongue gets cut out after she is raped. Titus then realises what has happened to her, and asks her to hell him who. However, she cannot, due to her tongue having been cut out and her hands cut off. Marcus then shows her how to write on the ground with a staff held between his wrists and mouth. She then writes the words, Chiron, Demetrius and rape on the ground. They then all kneel and take a vow to ‘not rest until the treacherous Goths have been made to pay with their blood.’

Key quotes Titus Andronicus

Act 3 Scene 2
-” This poor right hand of mine
Is left to tyrannize upon my breast,
Who, when my heart, all mad with misery,
Beats in this hollow prison of my flesh,
Then thus I thump it down.”
Titus to Lavinia, not wanting to live due to being sad, heart unable to love (symbolises). Personifies his heart. Only use for his remaining hand is to slow down his heart. Mad with misery- alliteration, makes seem worse than sad,dispare, hopelessness.

-“”
-“”

Titus Andronicus synopsis (short) act 2 scene 1

Aron the Moor begins this act with a long soliloquy. In this, he praises Tamora for her current position as empress, saying that she is powerful and safe: ‘Now climbeth Tamora Olympus’ top/Safe out of fortune’s shot, and sits aloft,’
He then reveals that his plans involving her are malicious; that he will rise to power as Tamora is madly in love with him. ‘To mount aloft with thy imperial mistress….Hast prisoner held, fett’red in amorous chains’.

His soliloquy is then interrupted by Chirron and Demitrius (Tamora’s sons) who are quarrelling over the love of Lavinia (Titus’s daughter). Demetrius uses his age against Chirron, saying that he is older and therefore more deserving of Lavinia, to which Chirron retorts by saying ‘I am as able and as fit as thou’, and by saying that he is better and should therefore get Lavinia.
Aron sees the argument as an advantage for him to exploit, and interrupts the two brothers, asking if she would really love two boys that she had never met such as themselves. He then persuades them help him in a plot against Titus, essentially telling them to rape Lavinia in a forrest where the hunt was taking place.
‘And many unfrequented plots there are/Fitted by kind for rape and villainy/Single you thither then this dainty doe/And strike her home by force, if not by words’. The brothers both agree.

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